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RADAR Keys explained: What are they, where can I use them and how do I get one?

People who need to use accessible toilets will know that many of them in the UK are fitted with a Nicholls & Clarke (N&C) Phlexicare RADAR National Key Scheme lock, which can only be opened with a Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation (RADAR) key. In this article, Independent mobility consultant Helen Dolphin MBE explains what RADAR keys are and how you can go about purchasing one if you have a disability.

What is a RADAR key?

The Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation, which is now Disability Rights UK, worked in partnership with Nicholls & Clarke, the inventors of the RADAR lock and together they created the National Key Scheme (NKS). The first RADAR locks were fitted in 1981 to help keep accessible toilets free and clean for disabled people.

Before RADAR locks were introduced, many establishments locked the accessible toilet themselves which meant that disabled people could only use the toilet on request. It also sometimes seemed to be the case that the key couldn’t be located by the staff member, or the person who had it wasn’t on duty that day. Fortunately, the introduction of the NKS meant disabled people could now use the toilet without having to ask someone if they could be let in.

Using your RADAR key

Although over 400 local authorities use the NKS, as well as many public, voluntary and commercial organisations there are still plenty of places that don’t and where this is the case I frequently encounter people rushing out of the toilet looking rather flustered and embarrassed when they see me waiting. However, it is always worth pointing out that not everyone using an accessible toilet looks disabled, as the person could have a non-visible disability, such as a colostomy bag, which means they need to use these toilets just as much as me. There are also still some establishments using their own locks, so you may find in these cases that you still have to ask to use the toilet.

Travelling to Europe


If you are travelling to Europe, the RADAR key will not work so you will need to buy a Eurokey. This is very similar to a RADAR key in that it enables access to accessible toilets. In order to obtain a key you will need to send proof of your disability to the organisation CBF Darmstadt. When I applied, I sent a copy of my Blue Badge which was accepted. These keys are quite expensive at €27. You can find out further information by visiting the CBF Darmstadt website although as the site is in German, I used Google translate to help me understand what to do.

How to get a RADAR key

In order to gain access to a toilet with a RADAR lock you will need a RADAR key. Most local authorities will sell or give you a RADAR key or you can buy one online. If you do buy your RADAR key online you’ll be faced with many different websites selling RADAR keys. Many of them claim to be genuine; however, if it is not the official N&C Phlexicare key it is not a RADAR key, according to Disability Rights UK. If you have an older RADAR key it will be completely silver. However, the newer style RADAR keys have a blue heart fob. The problem with buying a key that is not an official RADAR key is that its performance cannot be guaranteed. Therefore, they may not work in all the toilet locks and may even cause some damage. Disability Rights UK also uses proceeds from the N&C RADAR keys to support its charitable initiatives around independent living and providing free information and advice to disabled people throughout the UK.

Blue heart fob

The newer style RADAR keys have a blue heart fob

RADAR keys can be purchased at a large range of outlets including Disability Rights UK and the Blue Badge Company and if you are a disabled person you should be able to buy the key VAT free. RADAR keys cost about £4.50, but some local authorities do give them away free of charge. An NKS guide which lists the location of RADAR toilets for different regions is available to purchase from Disability Rights UK.

Although I support the NKS initiative as I like to find a clean toilet without anyone living in it, I do struggle to use the RADAR key myself. This is because I have no hands, so all keys are hard to turn. The new RADAR key with the blue heart fob is a lot lighter than the old style key which was quite big and heavy but it is still difficult for me to use independently. However, N&C Phlexicare have told me that a new electronically operated door system is being introduced in the near future which is fantastic news and something to look out for!


Read more of Helen Dolphin’s articles


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Qualifying for a Blue Badge with Personal Independence Payment (PIP)

Image Credits:

RADAR key with blue heart fob: © The Blue Badge Company

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